Month: March 2019

Trientje Eilts Post Calligraphy

This is part of the inscription in a book that Trientje Eilts Post (1808-1877) made for her daughter Annebken Hinrichs. The book was given to Annebken in 1851 when the family was living in Holtrop, Ostfriesland, Germany. The book is in the possession of a family member who graciously scanned the document and shared it […]

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Using ThruLines Webinar Released

My latest webinar on using ThruLines at AncestryDNA has been released and is available for ordering and download. It includes: understanding  where the information in the tree comes from–what’s yours and what’s someone else’s; basics of evaluating the information in the tree; responsibly using ThruLines(TM) information; limitations of ThruLines(TM) basics of how much DNA you typically share […]

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BCG Standards Manual-2nd Edition

There’s a new version of the Standards Manual written by the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG). I’ve ordered my copy and will be discussing it here after it arrives and as time allows. Manuals of this type are helpful if for no other reason than to get you thinking about how you research. This […]

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Where Oh Where Did They Get Walliburga? Why Did the User Trees Leave Him Alone?

One would think that ThruLines would at least be consistent in presenting a lineage. That thought would be wrong. As an experiment, the family tree attached to a set of test results only included the name of the mother of the testee (Grace [Mortier] Johnson, born in 1913 in Rock Island County, Illinois). ThruLines(tm) constructed a […]

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ThruLines Webinar Rescheduled

Due to my catching some “bug,” we’ve moved the ThruLines webinar to 17 March at 8 PM central. This delays the release of the recording until the 18th as well. Those who ordered should have received a notice (check your spam folder if you didn’t get it). You can still register for live attendance or […]

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Looking at More Double Connections

At least thirty-three of my DNA matches at AncestryDNA are related to me through Augusta Newman who died in White County, Indiana, in 1864 and his wife Melinda (Sledd) Newman who died in Linn County, Iowa. In looking at the shared centimorgans I had with some of those descendants, I noticed amounts that seemed a […]

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Your Own Unique Migration Chain

I’ve never been a huge fan of migration trails. Of course, how our ancestors got from point A to point B is important. However, what is generally more important is why our ancestors went from Point A to Point B. Usually that why was a person. A friend, relative, or former neighbor found out about […]

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